Skip to content

Architects of social media

How we architected our social media, and how maybe it's time to move on.

Anna Grigoryan
Anna Grigoryan
4 min read
Architects of social media

Last week I made this cover in Excalidraw to communicate what I'm feeling lately.

Although I made a lot of changes in my digital hygiene I still get overwhelmed by the amount of information I get.

All this got me thinking how I treated social media during past years. I deleted my social media in 2018 but it did not last long, merely 1 year later I was back to promote my personal blog (which morphed into this publication, hi there!).

I deleted Facebook, and recreated it to just be there as a placeholder of my digital self.

I deleted Instagram, and recreated it to follow a few key people I can't find elsewhere.

I deleted the Slack desktop app, because all those red notifications from workspaces started to drive me insane.

If you're close friend you most likely found me on Telegram those days.

When everyone moved to Telegram and I started to get around 10 messages a day about people from my contact list joining I started to look for another platform to go to.

The answer was Discord as communities I enjoyed are on Discord now.

And now I'm set as invisible on Discord, I muted all servers except of my server and just sit there undercover.

You must think: "Oh boy she must be bombarded with messages every time she's online".

No, I'm not.

We as users (not customers!) have almost no control as to what happens on these platforms.

Do we really need to have instant access to a curated virtual reality of 10,000 people on our feed?

I'm having conversations with podcast creators almost every day for my startup. One of the questions I ask is "How do you promote your podcast?" the answer usually is a heavy *sigh* and afterwards social media.

They HAVE to be on social media.

The ONLY way to get to the audience they want is to BE on social media.

The ONLY way to find other podcasters to collaborate is to BE on social media.

When I launch the product I HAVE to BE on social media to promote it.

And while it seems revolutionary to just be online on some platform to get instant attention, it also is kind of sad.

I found a bookstore in Vilnius that I enjoy a lot. It's a small nook where you can find obscure English books. The pretentious hipster inside me is very happy, thank you very much! I found it thanks to social media, so yay I guess?

Where are you? Fellow Rage against the machine fans? We are in the machine now, it's time to rage!


We should be over productivity content! 🎤

Hi! I decided to take the niche of your acquaintance that you meet once a week and they are talking very passionately about random topics. I changed the podcast into a one-woman show where I talk about myself (I'm a millennial what did you expect?).

More specifically trying to decouple technology from our day to day lives and see how it impacts our present, and changes the future.

Listen to the latest episode about productivity content and why I don't like it! :)


Drawer of Inspiration 🎥

1/ This party sucks, why haven't we left
How I discovered it: Today's edition of Elle Griffin's newsletter. Elle's newsletter is literally one of those I notice if I don't get. The care she has for the subject matter of writers and creator economy is very heartwarming. If you want to know more about writers on Substack or in general she's your girl!

Why I include the article:
I don't go on Facebook to learn about anything new anymore or meet people or talk to people. I opened Facebook yesterday just briefly because there was an earthquake in Armenia, and I wanted to know more from news outlets. It's been less then 20 years since we grow and fed this moody teenager called Facebook. Will it mature I don't know, but the party there indeed is not fun anymore. I never liked parties anyway!

Quote I loved:

"If a podcast starts a community today, they most likely do it on Discord. But if you’ve been on Facebook for years, you need a huge push to get people to move over to another medium. Facebook, like so many forms of capitalism, thrives on this sort of complacency. The party sucks, sure, but how else are you going to get dinner?"

2/ Learn how to draw and stop using Unsplash photo as everyone else
How I discovered it: through Erik Jones's tweet. I like following his account because his drawings are so funny, witty and topical that it would be a crime not to follow!

Why I include the article:
I draw the illustrations for this newsletter now, using Excalidraw, and also I do color paintings by the numbers as a hobby. I love how practical Nate's advice is and how you can apply it right away. Drawing illustrations for the newsletter is so rewarding so if you want to do that too, check the article out!

3/ The growing currency of personal recommendation
How I discovered: A friend sent it to me because I talk about curation all the time 😲

Why I include the article:
I started doing "Drawer of Inspiration" in the beginning of 2021, because I had a particularly hard week and wanted to share something that inspired me that week.

Throughout the year this publication changes so much but this section didn't. Now I'm using it to literally connect the dots for myself and hopefully for you.

My bet is that in soon creator economy will wake up to the fact that ability to bring context is more valuable then the ability hit mainstream success. At least I hope so.

And while we're in this capitalist hellscape we can enjoy each other's company in our architected social media and read these amazing articles!


All the ways you can support Community Weekly 🌱

Share the newsletter with your friend or colleague
Subscribe to the podcast on Spotify
Become a Pro member
Buy the Community-led course (starting tomorrow!)
Buy me a coffee or rather V60
Book a consultation with me


Thank you for your attention.

With love from Lithuania,

Anna.

newsletter